Creating Cool Content for Gaming: Cosplay’s & Co

This article is written for the (German) Blogparade „Geiler Content“ from talkabout.de. Anyway I’ll write in English as this is both the main language of my blog and of the western Gaming Industry.

Cool ContentCreating cool content is one of the biggest challenges in the daily life of a Community Manager. Not only do you need it to fill your channels with but also to engage customers, increase the bonding to the product or brand and to generate something lasting for the medium that never forgets.

When it comes to (especially non-casual) Gaming, Community Managers can be very thankful to have a Community that likes to engage with the products anyway. There are Let’s Players and Cosplayers, people writing awesome fan fictions or drawing gorgeous fan art. Last but not least there are all those filling up Game Wikis, publishing Gameplay Guides and maintaining Guild/Clan/Team Websites full of various Content.

We basically have Communities that are already creating cool content for free. Well, we all know there ain’t no such thing as a free lunch – you’ll need to review the Content (and that may include watching a full-length 90 Minutes Let’s Play before sharing it, to make sure it’s appropriate), you’ll need to manage when, where and how to publish it and of course you need to encourage your Community to create content.

And for the latter you need what every Community Manager should bring into his job anyway: lots of passion for your product(s). All of that costs your time and your time is being paid by the company you work for. When you use this content as your Community delivers it, you’ll just have no additional costs.

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5 Reasons Your Community Needs Trolling

5 reasons trolling

There is a tendency in the Internet to describe every online misbehavior as trolling.

  • Someone disturbing a feminist hashtag on Twitter with sock puppet accounts? TROLL!
  • Someone wrote „1st“ under a new YouTube Video? TROLL!
  • Someone impersonating a celebrity? TROLL!
  • Someone cyber-bullying a classmate? TROLL!
  • Someone threatening to rape and/or murder someone else? TROLL!

These are NOT trolls. These are assholes, criminals or simply bored kids, but they are NOT trolls.

„Trolling is a art“ [sic!]
(most likely Christopher Poole aka moot, founder of 4chan and Canvas)
„Trolls are making mischief“
(Donath, 1999)
„[Trolls] trigger or exacerbate conflict for the purposes of their own amusement / entertainment.“
(Hardaker, 2007)

//German readers may also find some information in my older article: „Konflikte als Entertainment: Trolling“  (Conflicts as Entertainment: Trolling)//

Trolls are an endangered species, hunted by uninformed Community Managers or Social Media Moderators, but every community should have at least one. And here are 5 Reasons why:

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Elitäre Diskussionen: nutzlose Scheiße oder nutzbringender Dünger?

Elitäre DiskussionenIch las in letzter Zeit viel von Anatol Stefanowitsch, einer zweifelsohne sehr klugen Person mit der ich in vielen Dingen übereinstimme (Anatol Stefanowitsch: tumblr, Twitter und höchst hörenswerter re:publica 2014 Vortrag für jene, die ihn nicht kennen).

Ein Gedanke der mir dabei immer und immer wieder durch den Kopf geht ist der folgende: Diskussionen über Feminismus, gendergerechte Sprache, politisch sinnvolle Veränderungen und andere tolle Ideen aus klugen Köpfen sind vor allem eines – elitär. Sie finden dort statt wo Menschen mit einem tendentiell hohen Bildungsniveau (sei dies über unser verkrüppeltes Bildungssystem, autodidaktisch oder sonstwie erworben) unterschiedlicher Meinungen aufeinander treffen.

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